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COASTAL WALKS

Sandcastle Walks




by Webmaster, 11th January 2017

Building sandcastles is one of the pleasures of a day at the beach, made even better when combined with an inspiring walk along the wonderful Welsh coast 

Pictures: © Crown Copyright (2016) Visit Wales 

Furious digging followed by patting, shaping and, nally, decorating with driftwood, shells and other beach treasures, sandcastle building remains one of the most popular family pastimes during a day on the beach. Children today enjoy it as much as the young did generations ago – and there’s not a digital device in sight! 

The key to creating a good sandcastle is using the right kind of sand. It must be wet, although not too wet, and is much easier to sculpt with a few tools. A bucket and spade are useful, of course, but many sand sculptors also use shaping and moulding tools to create the desired effect. Either way, here are three prime locations to wander around. Just click on the following route numbers for print-ready PDFs...

Route 1 - Whitesands Bay is one of the most spectacular beaches in Pembrokeshire 

Route 2 - Explore the gorgeous landscape beyond the beautiful beaches at Borth, Ceredigion 

Route 3 - A bracing sea walk along Abersoch’s main beach to the village of Mynytho

Route inaccessible? If you find that any of the routes featured on walesandborders.com has become inaccessible in any way, do let us know so we can alert the necessary authorities on your behalf. You can email the Web Editor by clicking here

For the full feature on sandcastle walks, see the August 2016 issue of Welsh Coastal Life. For back issues, click here

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