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 Wales leads the way in this year’s Historic Photographer of the Year

by Webmaster, 26th November 2021

Wales leads the way in this year’s Historic Photographer of the Year

Pic: © Steve Liddiard 

Steve Liddiard’s ‘spellbinding’ image of Whiteford Point Lighthouse in the Gower Peninsula beat off strong competition to win Historic Photographer of the Year 2021. 

As well as the beautiful light and composition, Steve won because of the way he captured the building’s historical significance. "The lighthouse was built in 1865 to a design by John Bowen, of Llanelli, to mark the shoals of Whiteford Point, replacing an earlier piled structure of 1854, of which nothing remains," explains Steve. "It is the only wave-swept cast iron tower of this size in Britain."

On the other side of the Border, a photograph of Hereford Cathedral (pictured below), by Jo Borzsony, was shortlisted for the way this famous monument was captured in all its glory. 

Pic: © Jo Borzsony

All the photographs submitted were judged on originality, composition and technical proficiency, as well as the story and history of the focus of the image. 

Broadcaster, Dan Snow, one of the judges, was bowled over by the standard of this year’s entries. 

"This year’s awards featured an outstanding array of fantastic and fascinating historical places across the globe,” he says. “The wonderful entries we’ve seen highlight both the immense heritage that surrounds us, along with the often precarious and fragile nature of some of our most precious locations of cultural value. 

“The awards demonstrate the huge dedication that entrants often go to when trying to capture that perfect shot, whether rising in the dead of night to capture the perfect sunrise or climbing, hiking and trekking their way to discover far-flung places from our past.”

 'This year’s awards featured an outstanding array of fantastic and fascinating historical places across the globe. The wonderful entries we’ve seen highlight both the immense heritage that surrounds us, along with the often precarious and fragile nature of some of our most precious locations of cultural value. The awards demonstrate the huge dedication that entrants often go to when trying to capture that perfect shot, whether rising in the dead of night to capture the perfect sunrise or climbing, hiking and trekking their way to discover far-flung places from our past.”

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